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Hyperlinking your WordPress CSS header image

One question that I’ve been struggling with over the last week is how to make the WordPress header image hyperlink back to the site itself. Many WordPress themes use the CSS background-image properly to display the header image. Unfortunately, there’s no direct way to modify the CSS style sheet to turn the image into a . . . → Read More: Hyperlinking your WordPress CSS header image

Recent news box on front page for Tiga 1.0.2 theme (obsoleted)

Note: This blog article has been superseded by the article at http://www.learncpp.com/?p=30.

I added a “recent news” box to the front page of the site, which shows the most recent items posted in the News category. It’s the easiest way to find the most up to date news about the site or the C++ Tutorial.

. . . → Read More: Recent news box on front page for Tiga 1.0.2 theme (obsoleted)

2.1 — Introduction to functions

In the last chapter, we defined a function as a collection of statements that execute sequentially. While that is certainly true, that definition doesn’t provide much insight into why functions are useful. Let’s update our definition: A function is a reusable sequence of statements designed to do a particular job.

You already know that every . . . → Read More: 2.1 — Introduction to functions

1.3 — Introduction to variables

Data

In lesson 1.1 — Statements and the structure of a program, you learned that the majority of instructions in a program are statements, and that statements are grouped into functions. These statements perform actions that (hopefully) generate whatever result the program was designed to produce.

But how do programs actually produce results? They . . . → Read More: 1.3 — Introduction to variables

1.2 — Comments

A comment is a programmer-readable note that is inserted directly into the source code of the program. Comments are ignored by the compiler and are for the programmer’s use only.

In C++ there are two different styles of comments, both of which serve the same purpose: to help programmers document the code in some way.

. . . → Read More: 1.2 — Comments

Tiga 1.0.2 widget fix for WordPress 2.2

This website utilizes the wonderful Tiga 1.0.2 theme, which works great under WordPress 2.1.3. However, when I upgraded the site to WordPress 2.2 (which now has built-in widget functionality), it quickly became clear that the widget functionality was not working properly under the Tiga 1.0.2 theme. Although you can set up your widgets, Tiga 1.0.2 . . . → Read More: Tiga 1.0.2 widget fix for WordPress 2.2

1.1 — Statements and the structure of a program

Chapter introduction

Welcome to the first primary chapter of these C++ tutorials!

In this chapter, we’ll take a first look at a number of topics that are essential to every C++ program. Because there are quite a few topics to cover, we’ll cover most at a fairly shallow level (just enough to get by). . . . → Read More: 1.1 — Statements and the structure of a program

0.7 — Compiling your first program

Before we can write our first program, we need to learn how to create new programs within our Integrated Development Environment (IDE). In this lesson, we’ll cover how to do that, and you’ll also compile and execute your first program!

Projects

To write a C++ program inside an IDE, we typically . . . → Read More: 0.7 — Compiling your first program

0.6 — Installing an Integrated Development Environment (IDE)

An Integrated Development Environment (IDE) is a piece of software that contains all of the things you need to develop, compile, link, and debug your programs.

With a typical C++ IDE, you get a code editor that does line numbering and syntax highlighting. Many (but not all) IDEs include a C++ compiler and a linker, . . . → Read More: 0.6 — Installing an Integrated Development Environment (IDE)

0.4 — Introduction to C++ development

Before we can write and execute our first C++ program, we need to understand in more detail how C++ programs get developed. Here is a graphic outlining a simplistic approach:

Step 1: Define the problem that you would like to solve

This is the “what” step, where you figure out what . . . → Read More: 0.4 — Introduction to C++ development