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6.5 — Multidimensional Arrays

The elements of an array can be of any data type, including arrays! An array of arrays is called a multidimensional array.

Since we have 2 subscripts, this is a two-dimensional array.

In a two-dimensional array, it is convenient to think of the first (left) subscript as being the row, and the second (right) subscript as being the column. This is called row-major order. Conceptually, the above two-dimensional array is laid out as follows:

[0][0]  [0][1]  [0][2]  [0][3]  [0][4] // row 0
[1][0]  [1][1]  [1][2]  [1][3]  [1][4] // row 1
[2][0]  [2][1]  [2][2]  [2][3]  [2][4] // row 2

To access the elements of a two-dimensional array, simply use two subscripts:

Initializing two-dimensional arrays

To initialize a two-dimensional array, it is easiest to use nested braces, with each set of numbers representing a row:

Although some compilers will let you omit the inner braces, we highly recommend you include them anyway, both for readability purposes and because of the way that C++ will replace missing initializers with 0.

Two-dimensional arrays with initializer lists can omit (only) the leftmost length specification:

The compiler can do the math to figure out what the array length is. However, the following is not allowed:

Just like normal arrays, multidimensional arrays can still be initialized to 0 as follows:

Note that this only works if you explicitly declare the length of the array! Otherwise, you will get a two-dimensional array with 1 row.

Accessing elements in a two-dimensional array

Accessing all of the elements of a two-dimensional array requires two loops: one for the row, and one for the column. Since two-dimensional arrays are typically accessed row by row, the row index is typically used as the outer loop.

In C++11, for-each loops can also be used with multidimensional arrays. We’ll cover for-each loops in detail later.

Multidimensional arrays larger than two dimensions

Multidimensional arrays may be larger than two dimensions. Here is a declaration of a three-dimensional array:

Three-dimensional arrays are hard to initialize in any kind of intuitive way using initializer lists, so it’s typically better to initialize the array to 0 and explicitly assign values using nested loops.

Accessing the element of a three-dimensional array is analogous to the two-dimensional case:

A two-dimensional array example

Let’s take a look at a practical example of a two-dimensional array:

This program calculates and prints a multiplication table for all values between 1 and 9 (inclusive). Note that when printing the table, the for loops start from 1 instead of 0. This is to omit printing the 0 column and 0 row, which would just be a bunch of 0s! Here is the output:

1    2    3    4    5    6    7    8    9
2    4    6    8    10   12   14   16   18
3    6    9    12   15   18   21   24   27
4    8    12   16   20   24   28   32   36
5    10   15   20   25   30   35   40   45
6    12   18   24   30   36   42   48   54
7    14   21   28   35   42   49   56   63
8    16   24   32   40   48   56   64   72
9    18   27   36   45   54   63   72   81

Two dimensional arrays are commonly used in tile-based games, where each array element represents one tile. They’re also used in 3d computer graphics (as matrices) in order to rotate, scale, and reflect shapes.

6.6 -- C-style strings
Index
6.4 -- Sorting an array using selection sort

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